OREGON MEDICAL HOME INFO
Announcements

National Academy for State Health Policy —Oregon 2014 CHIP Fact Sheet PDF
This fact sheet provides key information describing each state’s CHIP program at a time when states are both immersed in implementing the Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act and Affordable Care Act.

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Projects and Grant Initiatives

Medical Home Chapter Champions Program on Asthma, Allergy and Anaphylaxis (MHCCPAAA)
Through the support of the Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics (AANMA), the MHCCPAAA facilitates the dissemination of best practices, evidence-based guidelines and resources in asthma and allergy care to pediatricians in their states, and supports pediatricians in serving as advocates for change at local, state and national levels. MHCCPAAA seeks to support a successful, national chapter champion network model, initiate a team-based, care coordination and co-management quality improvement learning community; and cultivate an enhanced focus on advocacy and policy. If you are interested in more information about the project, fill out the Contact Us form.

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Asthma Care Management Improvement Initiative (ACMII)
The Children’s Health Foundation (CHF) supports pediatricians in the delivery of top quality pediatric asthma care and proactive management of the population of children with asthma. CHF pediatricians identified seven asthma care goals from the evidence-based NIHLBI Asthma Guidelines that distinguish quality asthma care and have implemented practical solutions to improve their delivery of optimal care. Pediatrician members of the Children’s Health Foundation have completed four years of active Asthma Care Management Improvement program work in which they defined meaningful and actionable clinical measures, developed a pediatric asthma registry with population reporting, benchmark/comparison reporting and actionable patient level reporting and developed effective training and implementation programs. Pediatric practices review real-time care management status reports through the CHA Pediatric Asthma Registry to identify patients needing elements of asthma care, and implement workflow and EMR solutions to operationalize enhanced asthma care management. After four years of collaboration, rapid cycle adoption of practical tools and workflows, transparent measurement and continuous improvement, 130 pediatricians collectively raised the bar on pediatric asthma care to a level rarely matched anywhere in the country.

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Childhood and Adolescent Immunization Improvement Initiatives
The Children’s Health Foundation (CHF)supports pediatric providers in their efforts to improve Childhood and Adolescent Immunization rates. CHF provides the methodologies and tools to enable pediatric providers to collect data reflecting the reasons why their two-year-olds are not up-to-date on immunizations. Through targeted strategies and workflow improvements, participants have significantly increased two-year-old immunization rates and are applying their impressive successes to the Adolescent population which focuses on the completeness of immunizations for youth who have turned thirteen. Keys to the success of these initiatives include the ability to collect meaningful, actionable data and the ability to target interventions to root causes.

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Pediatric Care Management for Children and Youth with Special Healthcare Needs Improvement Collaborative
In August, 2011, the Children’s Health Foundation convened a team of pediatric leaders and others in our community to assess the feasibility and value of office-based pediatric care management. The multi-disciplinary group formulated a list of essential Care Management Competencies in order for primary care pediatric practices to deliver better care, become more organized and efficient with managing patients, and improve medical home preparedness.
CHF supports pediatricians in enhancing or formalizing their care delivery models to support effective operation as a pediatric primary care medical home. The pediatric provider plays an important role in caring for children with the most complex physical and psycho-social conditions. These families need a high functioning pediatric medical home that effectively delivers top quality care as well as promotes their ability to effectively self-manage their children’s needs.
CHF is facilitating a multi-disciplinary Pediatric Care Management Improvement Collaborative to engage innovators from over twenty leading pediatric practices as well as guests from pediatric medical and community programs in monthly education, problem solving and development of solutions to advance care management in pediatrics. Collaborative topics have included: Identification and Segmentation of Pediatric Population, Care Management Competencies & Roles, Assessing the Needs of the Child and Family, Team Approaches to Patient-Centered Care, Care Coordinator Networking, Medical Home Certification Standards, Documentation and Workflows, Patient Centered Care Plans for the Medical Home, Pre-visit Planning, Family Surveys and Well Visit Planners.

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Enhancing Child Health in Oregon (ECHO): Medical Home Learning Collaborative
Project Period: August 2011 - August 2014
The ECHO Learning Collaborative is a breakthrough-series style effort with eight primary care practices focused on medical home that is led by the Oregon Pediatric Improvement Parertnership, in collaboration with the Oregon Rural Practice-Based Research Network. The ECHO Learning Collaborative is led by OPIP and is a collaboration with the Oregon Rural and Practice-Based Research Network. The ECHO Learning Collaborative is a an effort under the rubric of the Tri-State Children’s Health Improvement Consortium (T-CHIC) and  falls under the CHIPRA Quality Demonstration Grant’s “Category C” activities focused on provider-based models for improvement. Over the course of the three year learning collaborative, practices will participate in five learning sessions focusing on core medical home concepts, while developing participants’ quality improvement skills and practices’ capacity for change. The first learning session (November 2011), focused on practice-based strategies for identification of children and youth with special health care needs. The second Learning Session (May 2012) focused on care coordination. Future learning sessions will focus on care coordination, behavioral and mental health integration, patient engagement, and adaptive capacity.

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LEND Programs Receive Funding to Improve the Health of Children with Special Health Care Needs
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded $28.3 million to 43 Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Other Related Disabilities (LEND) programs, including the program at the Oregon Health & Science University, to help improve the health of infants, children, adolescents and young adults with neurodevelopmental and other related disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders. LEND programs prepare trainees from a wide variety of professional disciplines to assume leadership roles, ensure high levels of interdisciplinary clinical competence, and enhance the ability of clinicians to diagnose, treat, and manage complex disabilities in youth and adolescents.

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Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) Initiative—Oregon
The Oregon Health Care Quality Corporation (Quality Corp) leads the AF4Q initiative called Partner for Quality Care: Information for a Healthy Oregon in Willamette Valley. The priorities of the Quality Corp are to promote the availability and use of understandable quality information to inform decision-making, stimulate cooperation among all health care stakeholders and support the development of a health information infrastructure so that Oregonians' health information is always available.

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Consortium to Advance Medical Homes for Medicaid and CHIP Participants
National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP)—January 2011
Fifteen state teams, including Oregon, were brought together by the NASHP to form a Consortium to Advance Medical Homes for Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Participants. These states worked together to develop and implement policies that increase Medicaid and CHIP program participants' access to high performing medical homes. For more information, see the blog post, Constructive Ideas from Medical Home Builders, and the report, Building Medical Homes: Lessons from Eight States with Emerging Programs.

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Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Grant (2010-2015)—Building Healthy Families
Jackson County School District #6, Central Point, OR
The federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) awarded this five-year grant to provide approximately $50,000 per year to improve child health through community-based initiatives on prevention and access to health service for vulnerable populations. The primary goal of the project is to initiate a community effort to improve the physical and mental health of children in poverty in Central Point, OR. Barriers include lack of awareness, transportation, language and culture and a general sense of anxiety or distrust about getting help from formal service systems. Building Healthy Families will address the physical and mental needs of vulnerable, low income students through the services of a school-based health center. Focusing on prevention, treatment of acute conditions and management of chronic conditions will result in better attendance, and improved behavior of students. For more information contact Jesse Hanwit, MA, ED.S.OTR/L at jesse.hanwit@district6.org.

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Oregon START (Screening Tools and Referral Training) Program
The Oregon Pediatric Society and Children’s Health Alliance adapted this educational program from the START program of the Tennessee Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. The goals of START are to improve developmental and behavioral screening in pediatric practices, improve providers’ understanding and utilization of screening tools, educate providers on documentation and coding of screening tools, and improve awareness of community resources for evaluation and intervention. With an effective strategy in place for implementation of these objectives, Oregon START is approved by the American Board of Pediatrics for Part IV Maintenance of Certification as an established quality improvement project. 

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Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Grants
Oregon is a lead on one of 10 CHIPRA grants, representing single-state projects and multi-state collaborations, from HHS to improve health care quality and delivery systems for children enrolled in Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The money will help states implement and evaluate provider performance measures and utilize health information technologies such as pediatric electronic health records and other quality improvement initiatives.

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The Safety Net Medical Home Initiative 
In May 2008, The Commonwealth Fund, Qualis Health and the MacColl Institute for Healthcare Innovation at the Group Health Research Institute initiated a demonstration project to help safety net primary care clinics become high-performing patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). Five Regional Coordinating Centers were selected to participate in the demonstration project, and each partnered with 12-15 safety net clinics in their state. These collaboratives will receive technical assistance on practice re-design topics such as enhanced access, care coordination, and patient experience. They will also receive funding to support a Medical Home Facilitator (who will lead clinic-based quality improvement projects) and other activities. The work of the Regional Coordinating Centers began in April 2009 and the Initiative will continue through April 2013.

  • Oregon Primary Care Association & CareOregon
  • Paying for the Medical Home—Payment Models to Support Patient-Centered Medical Home Transformation in the Safety Net PDF
    Safety Net Medical Home Initiative
    Operating as a medical home requires increased non-reimbursed activity (eg, care team meetings, patient self-management education, care coordination, data analysis, communication with other clinicians) and care management. In order for patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practice transformations to be sustainable, there must be payment reform to incentivize high-value, first-contact, primary care, and support medical home costs that are traditionally not reimbursed (eg, non face-to-face encounters). This publication provides an introduction to a series of policy briefs focusing on payment reform opportunities to support and sustain the medical home.

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Patient-Centered Primary Care Home Program
The Patient-Centered Primary Care Home Program is part of Oregon's efforts to fulfill a vision of better health, better care and lower costs for all Oregonians. By recognizing clinics that offer patient-centered primary care, they hope to begin breaking down the barriers that stand between patients and good health.

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Patients and Families as Health Care Leaders
Six organizations will receive technical assistance and start-up funding from the Oregon Health Care Quality Corporation to implement programs that place patients at every level of decision-making.

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The Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD) Program
The ABCD Program is funded by the Commonwealth Fund, administered by National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP), and designed to assist states in improving the delivery of early child development services for low-income children and their families by strengthening primary health care services and systems that support the healthy development of young children, ages 0-3. The program focuses particularly on preventive care of children whose health care is covered by state health care programs, especially Medicaid. Since 2000, the ABCD program has helped twenty-seven states create models of service delivery and financing through a laboratory for program development and innovation.

  • The Enduring Influence of the ABCD Initiative
    National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP)
    In May 1999, NASHP and The Commonwealth Fund launched the ABCD project. Oregon was one of the states included in this initiative. This report offers lessons, strategies, and policies learned over the past 12 years through this initiative.
  • Measuring and Improving Care Coordination: Lessons from ABCD III
    National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP)
    Through the ABCD III initiative, Oregon piloted and evaluated strategies to improve care coordination among primary care providers and community service providers serving Medicaid-eligible children. This report describes state evaluation methods, summarizes the results, and highlights lessons learned about evaluating care coordination. .

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Rural Health Information Technology Grants
Funded through HRSA, rural health networks across the nation will receive more than $11.9 million to support their adoption of HIT and certified Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Each of 40 grantee organizations will receive about $300,000 to purchase equipment, install broadband networks and provide training for staff. In Oregon, the grantee is the Mid Rogue Foundation. The pilot program was developed as a result of the President's Rural Health Initiative.

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in Your State
HRSA in Your State offers overviews of HRSA programs and current information, such as the number and amount of grants awarded down to the County level. It also provides state-specific information about health centers, National Health Service Corps members and the communities they serve, and the number of participating providers through the 340B program.

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Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) State Contacts
The Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) launched the State Maternal and Child Health Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS) Initiative to implement the MCHB Strategic Plan for Early Childhood Health. The purpose of ECCS is to support states and communities in their efforts to build and integrate early childhood service systems that address the critical components of access to comprehensive health services and medical homes; social-emotional development and mental health of young children; early care and education; parenting education, and family support. For additional information, you can look up your state's ECCS Grantee Contact or Grantee Web site.

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AAP: Community Pediatrics Grant Database
The Community Pediatrics Grant Database archives previously funded Community Pediatrics grant projects, including those funded through the CATCH Program, the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program, the Community Pediatrics Training Initiative and the Healthy People 2010 Chapter Grants. The database is searchable by seven major categories: target population, health topic, state/territory, project activity, AAP program, AAP district, and project year. Members of the AAP can obtain grantee contact information by searching through the Member Center. If you are not an AAP member, but have questions please contact docbi@aap.org.

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Health Home State Plan Amendment
Oregon received a Section 2703 Health Home Amendment to make payments to practices participating in the Patient-Centered Primary Care Homes.  The funding supports payments for inter-disciplinary health care teams. These teams integrate and coordinate all the primary, acute, behavioral health and long-term services and supports for Medicaid patients with chronic conditions.  Designated health home providers include family practitioners, pediatricians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

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Funding Opportunities
This page houses information on funding opportunities from the AAP and other organizations, as well as links to other key funding contacts and resources.

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Partners in State

This section provides information on state organizations that play a role in implementing various aspects of medical home, and includes links to their Web sites and contact information.

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Chapter—Oregon
AAP chapters are organized groups of pediatrician members and other health care professionals working to achieve AAP goals in their communities. Please contact your local chapter for additional state resources.

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American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) Chapter—Oregon
AAFP represents more than 94,000 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students.

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Family Voices Chapter—Oregon
Family Voices aims to achieve family-centered care for all children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and/or disabilities. Through a national network of chapters, they provide families with tools to advocate for improved public and private policies, and build partnerships among professionals and families.

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Family-to-Family Health Information Centers (F2F HICs)
F2F HICs are non-profit organizations that help families of CYSHCN and the professionals who serve them. F2F HICs are typically staffed by parents of CYSHCN who understand the issues that families face, provide advice, offer resources, and tap into a network of other families and professionals for support and information.

Oregon Family to Family Health Information Center
Address: 707 SW Gaines Street CDRC, Portland, OR 97239-3011
Phone: 503/494-6961 | Fax: 503/494-2755 | Toll-Free: 855/323-6744
Primary Contact: Tamara Bakewell at bakewell@ohsu.edu

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Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Director & Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) Director
Title V of the Social Security Act is the nation's oldest federal program to improve the health of all mothers, infants, children, adolescents, and CSHCN. Title V is administered by the Federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) as a block grant to states to support core public health functions, such as care coordination and rehabilitation services.

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Early Hearing Detection & Intervention (EHDI) Contact(s)
State EHDI programs promote universal newborn hearing screening, develop effective tracking and follow-up as a part of the public health system, promote appropriate and timely diagnosis of hearing loss, prompt enrollment in appropriate early intervention, ensure a medical home for all newborns, and strive to eliminate geographic and financial barriers to service access.

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State Newborn Screening & Genetics Programs

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Early Intervention/Part C Coordinators
The Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C of IDEA) is a federal grant program that assists states in operating a comprehensive statewide program of early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities, ages birth through age 2 years, and their families.

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State Section 619/Special Education for ages 3-5 Coordinators
This program provides free appropriate public education (FAPE) for children, ages 3 through 5 years, with disabilities.

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State Interagency Coordinating Council (ICC) Chairs
This program advises appropriate agencies on the unmet needs in early childhood special education and early intervention programs for children with disabilities, assists in the development and implementation of policies that constitute a statewide system, and assists all appropriate agencies in achieving full participation, coordination, and cooperation for implementation of statewide system.

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Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
CHIP is Title XXI of the Social Security Act and is a state and federal partnership that targets uninsured children and pregnant women in families with incomes too high to qualify for most state Medicaid programs, but often too low to afford private coverage. Within federal guidelines, each state determines the design of its individual CHIP program, including eligibility parameters, benefit packages, and administrative procedures. The Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) of 2009 re-authorized the program through FY 2013, and includes many incentives for states to find and enroll more eligible children in both Medicaid and CHIP. CHIPRA also includes quality provisions that aim to monitor and improve care delivered through the Medicaid and CHIP programs. Each state does have a CHIP program, and the names of these programs differ from state to state. To find information on health coverage programs in your state, visit the InsureKidsNow.gov Web site.

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Medicaid State Directors
Medicaid is Title XIX of the Social Security Act and is a federal/state entitlement program that provides medical assistance to certain individuals and families with low incomes and/or special health care needs. Medicaid is of unique importance to children; together with the CHIP, Medicaid insures more than one in four children in the United States, with millions more eligible but currently unenrolled. The Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program is a critical component of Medicaid, which guarantees that children enrolled in Medicaid are screened for medical or developmental problems early, and that necessary treatments and services are provided. To find information on health coverage programs in your state, visit the InsureKidsNow.gov Web site.

  • Medicaid State Reports—2011
    The American Academy of Pediatrics, in partnership with the National Association of Children's Hospitals, has created fact sheets that explain the importance of the Medicaid program, and how children in every state rely on it for their health care.

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Community Health Centers in the State
HRSA provides a searchable database of federally-funded health centers. Health centers provide care to those with or without health insurance including well-care check ups, treatment when sick, complete care during pregnancy, immunizations and checkups for children, dental care, prescription drugs, and mental health and substance abuse care.

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Regional Extension Centers (RECs)
Health Information Technology RECs support and serve health care providers to help them quickly become adept and meaningful users of electronic health records (EHRs). RECs are designed to make sure that primary care clinicians get the help they need to use EHRs by providing training in adopting EHRs, guidance with implementation, and technical assistance as needed.

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Help Me Grow
Help Me Grow (HMG) is a collaborative, cross-sector system that assists states in identifying at-risk children, then helping families find community-based programs and services. The organization and its affiliates do not provide direct services. Rather, it is a system for improving access to existing resources and services for children through age eight. States affiliated with the Help Me Grow National Center use the HMG system to implement effective, universal, early surveillance and screening for all children, and then link them to existing quality programs.

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Children's Health Foundation
The Children’s Health Foundation (CHF) is a non-profit corporation which leads pediatricians in their efforts to improve the quality of care within their practice, to raise consumer awareness on health issues, and to achieve better children’s health outcomes. The Foundation is engaged in several Quality Improvement Initiatives that enable meaningful change at the practice level which directly improves the quality of care for the children in the community. CHF assembles leading pediatricians to declare clinical initiatives and rapidly develop, test, and spread practical and sustainable improvements in pediatric care. CHF is staffed with a highly effective blend of roles including physician, process engineering, quality improvement and analytical experts who are effective in championing the development and analytics of Foundation programs, thereby enabling pediatricians and their practices to focus on implementation of care delivery processes and enhancing the quality of patient care.

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Coordinated Care Organizations
In 2011, Oregon established the Oregon Integrated and Coordinated Health Care Delivery System. This system established a statewide network of Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs) to provide coordinated health care for Oregon Health Plan enrollees.  Currently there are 16 CCOs across the state that are responsible for coordinating the physical, behavioral, mental and dental care for the enrollees providing services to children as well as adults.

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Public Policy/Legislation

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP)—Oregon State Profile pdf download
These state profiles provide a snapshot of how the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant (Title V) works in specific states. The profiles detail the federal funds appropriated to each state, state match, specific programs funded, numbers of people receiving services and state health needs.

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Early Childhood State Policy Profiles
National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)
NCCP’s Early Childhood Profiles were produced as part of the Improving the Odds for Young Children project. These comprehensive profiles highlight states’ policy choices that promote health, education, and strong families alongside other contextual data related to the well-being of young children.

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Issue Brief: Implementing the Medical Home in Medicaid, CHIP, and Multistakeholder Demonstration Programs pdf download
American Academy of Pediatrics (Member access only)

This Issue Brief serves to provide guidance to AAP chapters working with states to implement medical home projects in Medicaid and CHIP as well as multipayer demonstration programs. It also addresses a number of the policy questions that frequently arise in creating state supports for the medical home.

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Medical Home Data

Medical Home Data Portal—State Data Pages
Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative
The Medical Home State Data Portal profiles provide a state’s medical home performance level for all children and children with special health care needs, based on data from the 2009/2010 National Survey on Children with Special Health Care Needs, 2007 National Survey on Children's Health and the 2005/2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs.

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Child Health USA 2013 pdf download
US Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration

This annual statistical report highlights the health status and service needs of America's children. The report contains easy-to-access graphs and charts summarizing significant indicators of children's health status, statistics, figures, and references.

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America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2011
Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics

The purposes of the report are to improve Federal data on children and families and make these data available in an easy-to-use, non-technical format. It organizes well-being indicators into seven sections: family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.

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KIDS COUNT Databook
Annie E Casey Foundation
This report is a national and state-by-state profile of the well-being of America's children available as an interactive databook, a complete PDF-format report, and on request, in print. Data and rankings on 10 key indicators of child well-being are available by state, county, and city.

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State-at-a-Glance Chartbook on Coverage and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs
The Catalyst Center
The Online State-at-a-Glance Chartbook provides data on carefully selected indicators of health coverage and health care financing for CYSHCN. Using the online Chartbook, you can access data for your state and easily compare it with both national averages and other states' data.

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National Healthcare Quality & Disparities Reports
Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ)

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50-State Demographics Wizard
National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)

This tool allows you to create custom tables of national- and state-level statistics about low-income or poor children. Choose areas of interest, such as parental education, parental employment, marital status, and race/ethnicity—among many other variables.

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Adolescent Health Database
National Adolescent Health Information Center (NAHIC)
The NAHIC database includes national and state-level profiles of key measures of the health of adolescents and young adults. National-level data is available by gender and race/ethnicity and also state-by-state, with summaries, data tables, and guidance for using this data to improve the health of adolescents and young adults.

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Medical Home Data Fact Sheet—January 2009 PDF
American Academy of Pediatrics
To inform key aspects of the pediatric medical home, the AAP has compiled a data fact sheet of summary statistics and facts from various AAP and public and proprietary sources. These data define the current state of pediatric care, and as the efforts surrounding the promotion and expansion of the pediatric medical home accelerate, the fact sheet will change to reflect this new picture.

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Profile of Pediatric Visits—April 2010 PDF
American Academy of Pediatrics

This report is based on the most current available four years worth of NAMCS and MEPS data (2004-2007).  The updated report includes annualized estimates by source of payment, patient age, physician specialty, well vs sick visit, office setting, practice ownership, physician employment status, and geographic location.

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Other Resources

AAP Child Health Informatics Center—State and Territory Specific HIT Resources
This page on the AAP AAP Child Health Informatics Center (CHIC) Web site allows you to identify pediatric specific HIT resources by state related to Meaningful Use, Regional Extension Centers, State Health Information Exchanges, and other important information.

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Impact of the Oregon Health Plan on Children With Special Health Care Needs
Mitchell JB, Khatutsky G, and Swigonski N. Pediatrics. Apr 2001;107:736-743.

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In the News: 'Medical Home' Strategy Aims to Boost Quality, Cut Costs with Better Primary Health Care
Kaiser Permanente plans to convert all of its clinics in Oregon and southwest Washington to the medical home model over the next year, The Oregonian reports. The nonprofit health plan CareOregon helped 15 community health centers and safety net clinics win grants from The Commonwealth Fund to establish medical homes. And proposed legislation would set aside $400,000 to establish a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) research and training center at Oregon Health & Science University.

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In the News: Medical Home Initiative in Oregon
Program Coordinates Foster Kids' Medical Care
This article, published on September 24, 2010 in The Oregonian, highlights the program, Medical Home for Children in Foster Care which is the first of its kind in Oregon. The program provides coordinated health care for foster kids—whether it is preventive, urgent, mental or behavioral care—and tracks their medical histories in binders that go with the children from home to home.

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The Medical Home Model of Primary Care: Implications for the Healthy Oregon Act PDF
Office for Oregon Health Policy and Research, December 2007
The aim of this paper is to provide the public with information on the current status of the primary care system in Oregon as well as an overview of the role for medical homes in this environment.

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Defining the Medical Home: The Oregon Experience
J Am Board Fam Med. November 2012. 25:6869-877
In 2009, the state of Oregon convened a public, legislatively mandated committee charged with developing PCMH measures. This article reports on the process of, outcomes of, and lessons learned by this committee.

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Collaborating With Medicaid to Improve Health Care to Multi-Payer Alliances
Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q)
This paper illustrates how and why Medicaid agencies are aligning their quality improvement strategies with other payers, and includes case studies from Oregon and South Central Pennsylvania to illustrate improved care quality and a reduction in disparities.

 

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